Wed., Sept. 17, 2014
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Today's
High Tides
Great Kills Harbor
A.M.
P.M.
3:11
3:11
Atlantic Highlands
A.M.
P.M.
2:55
3:15
Sandy Hook,
Fort Hancock
A.M.
P.M.
3:05
3:25
Belmar,
Ocean
A.M.
P.M.
2:30
2:50
Manasquan Inlet,
USCG Station
A.M.
P.M.
2:53
3:13
Atlantic City
A.M.
P.M.
2:55
3:21
Cape May,
Ocean
A.M.
P.M.
3:29
3:55
East Point,
Delaware Bay
A.M.
P.M.
4:42
5:10

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New Jersey
Saltwater Fishing Report

Report from Monday, September 15.

| Keyport | Atlantic Highlands | Neptune | Belmar | Brielle | Point Pleasant Beach | Seaside Heights | Barnegat Light | Brigantine | Ocean City | Sea Isle City | Avalon | Cape May | Last Thursday's Report |
THIS REPORT IS UPDATED
EVERY MONDAY AND THURSDAY
Keyport
With Papa’s Angels Charters, Ben Card and friends bagged three fluke and released throwbacks, plenty, on Friday at the West Bank on Raritan Bay, Capt. Joe said. Seas were calm, after the nor’easter, and mostly spearing and squid were fished. But weather was back on a trip Sunday with Alfred Lerman and friends that met howling wind on the ocean. Fluke fishing was slow in the conditions. Open-boat trips for fluke are available daily when no charter is booked. Telephone to reserve.

All trips were cancelled aboard this past week, because of the “nasty east wind,” Capt. Frank from the Vitamin Sea wrote in an email. Fluke were stacked up at Ambrose Channel, but trips couldn’t reach them. Some of the fish are jumbos, and now is the best shot at them. This will be the final full weekend of fluke fishing, because fluke season will be closed starting the following Sunday, September 28. Charters are fishing, and open-boat trips will sail for fluke all week and all weekend. Get your last licks in, he said. Striped bass and blackfish charters are being booked for autumn. If anglers want to secure dates for spring stripers, that book is open, too. “Get your dose of Vitamin Sea!”

Atlantic Highlands
Capt. Ron from the party boat Fishermen was pleasantly surprised when Sunday’s trip caught some fluke, after Saturday’s rough weather and bad weather all week, he wrote in a report on the vessel’s website. Conditions were tough for the fishing in the morning on Sunday’s trip, but the anglers picked away at fluke – throwbacks and keepers – the whole outing. Bucktails worked best, especially to nail keepers. John Froelich scored best, limiting out on fluke to 6 pounds. Another angler bagged four, and another bagged three, and so on, Ron said. Another angler won the pool with a 6-1/2-pounder. The Fishermen is fishing for fluke 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily and for striped bass 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. every Monday through Saturday.

All the fluke trips sailed on the party boat Atlantic Star, and Tuesday was the last day the vessel was weathered out, Capt. Tom said. That was the worst day of weather during the nor’easter, and the angling on Friday morning’s trip was no good. A few fluke were caught on the afternoon’s trip. Saturday’s fluking was tough in miserable weather, and the boat had to fish the bay, because seas rolled too much on the ocean at the channels, and at Flynn’s Knoll. A few keepers and some throwbacks were landed. Sunday’s fishing was better, and the morning trip scooped up more keeper fluke than on the previous two days. Sunday afternoon’s trip was the best in some time, and some anglers bagged two or three keepers, and all customers at least reeled in throwbacks. Weather was beautiful, and the boat drifted the best in a time. This morning’s fluking was off to a slow start, Tom said in a phone call at 9:30 a.m. aboard, when he gave this report. He planned to move the boat to the edge of the channels. Seas weren’t too rough to fish there before, but conditions weren’t like he preferred. Only 12 days are left until fluke season is closed on September 28. When the season is closed, the boat will bottom fish for porgies, blackfish and sea bass. One blackfish is the bag limit, but some anglers will like to “practice.” Six will be the limit starting November 16. Sea bass will be targeted once sea bass season is opened on October 18. The Atlantic Star is fishing for fluke on two trips daily from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 6 p.m.

Neptune
Last Lady Fishing Charters fished for cod on Thursday, Capt. Ralph wrote in an email. The trip was mentioned in the last report here, but Ralph gave a few more details in the email. Wind was no longer strong that day, after the nor’easter, but Shark River Inlet was rough, and the ocean held big swells. Lots of big cod, no pollock, were punched. “Very funny bite, just pushing the baits,” Ralph said. Lou Truppi won the pool, and weather started turning worse, so the trip sailed back to port at 10:30 a.m. The ride was rough, “but most everyone had a good time,” Ralph said. A trip Sunday sailed to the ocean, and turned back, because of wind. The anglers, a bachelor party, fished Shark River instead, hooking one keeper fluke and a bunch of throwbacks. The weekly, individual-reservation trip for fluke, fishing the ocean, is sold out this Tuesday. Spaces remain for the year’s final one, next week on Tuesday, September 23, before fluke season is closed on September 28. A marathon one of the trips is also sold out on September 26. ***Update, Monday, 9/15:*** Two spaces became available for Tuesday’s individual-reservation trip for fluke, because the anglers cancelled, Ralph wrote in an email. He’ll announce individual-reservation trips for other fish soon. Charters are available, and fishing is good for most species. Striped bass should show up soon, and blackfishing will begin on November 16, when six of the tautog will become the bag limit, from the current limit of one.

Belmar
Little could be reported in wind and rain last week that kept most from fishing, said Bob from Fisherman’s Den. But thank goodness that’s changed, he said, and the surf came alive. Baitfish moved into the water, and striped bass, bluefish, fluke and false albacore fed on them. This was a good time to fish the surf with Danny plugs or popper lures, or, for the albies, metal. “Fly fishermen also (scored) well,” he said. Shark River’s fishing for fluke and snappers held up, and kingfish were also nabbed from the river. Blackfishing was red hot at Point Pleasant Canal, and remember that one blackfish is the bag limit, he said. “Looking good – fall is here,” he said.

Weather for trips looked good for today and the next few days, a report on the party boat Golden Eagle’s website said. Trips aboard sometimes dealt with weather, but good fishing for big blues was hammered on Friday night’s trip. Wind blew 25 or 30 knots from northeast on Saturday’s daytime trip, creating nasty seas, and bluefishing was no good in the conditions, and the trip returned early. Saturday night’s trip was weathered out. Big blues were picked on Sunday’s trip, just not enough. The Golden Eagle is bluefishing 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily and 7:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Also see the Golden Eagle’s tuna schedule.

The bluefishing trip today sailed to near the Mudhole, plowing a good
catch of 8- to 14-pounders, picking away throughout the time, on the party boat Miss Belmar Princess, an email from the vessel said. Chris Burgess from Branson, Mo., won the pool with a 14-pounder. Bluefishing was tough on Friday night’s trip, until 12:30 a.m. Then catches picked up, ending up good, “but we had to put some extra time in,” the email said. Luis Paz from Elizabeth won the pool with a 14-pounder. Saturday’s trip returned early, because of rough seas that also cancelled that night’s trip. On Sunday’s trip, bluefishing started slowly. “(Then) we picked away at 8- to 12-pound blues … ” and a couple of false albacore, it said. The Miss Belmar Princess is fishing 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily and 7:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. every Friday and Saturday.

Brielle
Ed Nolan from Manasquan took the lead in the monthly pool with a 9.2-pound fluke on Friday on the party boat Jamaica II, Capt. Ryan wrote in an email. Was a rough week of weather, cancelling some trips in the middle of the week. “But all is quiet now,” Ryan said, and fluke fishing was great when conditions were right. On the same trip, Pete Talevi and Alex Pilewski from Trenton limited out on the flatfish to 7 pounds. Lots of fluke were around, and the big ones hung around rocks and wrecks, so that’s where trips mostly fished. Bucktails caught best, but bait worked well when the boat drifted fast. The Jamaica II is fishing for fluke 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays and 7:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. every Monday.

Fluke fishing slowed on the ocean since the nor’easter last week, said Eric from The Reel Seat. Some were still picked at the reefs, and fluke stacked up at Manasquan Inlet, apparently migrating toward the ocean from Manasquan River. Fishing for them was good at the inlet, and not many were keepers, but rods could be bent with throwbacks. False albacore fishing was amazing in the inlet on Saturday evening. The little tunny were hooked on small tins. Snapper blues remained in the river, growing to 10 or 12 inches. Surf fishing for striped bass was good at Sea Girt and Spring Lake the past few mornings. The bass chased mullet, so Polaris popper lures and metal-lipped swimmers caught the bass. Not much news came in about wreck fishing, probably because of the weather, and because sea bass season was closed. But fish like ling could still be targeted at wrecks. Plenty of bluefish, weighing up to the teens, were boated from the ocean before the weather. During daytime, bonito and frigate mackerel could be mixed in. Bonito fishing was good at places like Manasquan Ridge. Sizable mahi mahi to 15 and 20 pounds were picked. A few false albacore and Spanish mackerel were fought. When boaters could sail offshore in the weather, tuna fishing became better to the north at Block Canyon or the Fish Tails. Yellowfin tuna 60 to 80 pounds were chunked all night long. A handful of bigeye tuna were chunked, and trolling for bigeyes during daytime seemed to slow somewhat. But longfin tuna were trolled there. Longfins were sometimes trolled at Hudson and Toms canyons. Shimano pro staffer Roy Leyva will give the shop’s next free seminar at 7 p.m. Thursday, October 2. He’ll cover both the Shimano Long Cast Surf System and fishing Cape Cod Canal.

Point Pleasant Beach
After crummy weather on Saturday, “we (were) back on the flatties (Sunday),” Capt. Matt from the party boat Norma-K III wrote in a report on the vessel’s website. Another captain skippered the boat that day, telling Matt that the morning trip had good action on fluke to 5 pounds, including keepers and shorts. Fluking began slowly on the afternoon trip, but picked up as the trip went on, ending up with a good number of keepers to 6 pounds and some shorts. Squid and spearing caught best, better than Gulps and bucktails that hooked a few, on both trips. Bluefishing was great on nighttime trips. Big ones 10 to 15 pounds were smashed, and anglers left with lots of fillets. The Norma-K III is fishing for fluke on two trips daily from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2 to 6:30 p.m., and for bluefish from 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. daily.

Seaside Heights
Mullet that migrated to the surf got fishing going a bit, a report said on
The Dock Outfitters’ website. “Bluefish … stepped up the chase (there),”
it said, because of the bait, and fluke even seemed a little more aggressive than before. The mullet run never usually fails to improve striped bass fishing in the surf. A few throwback stripers and a couple of keepers were beached that were known about, but no keepers were weighed in. Metal and swimming plugs banked the bass. But mullet, clams and cut bunker could be fished for them. The Dock Outfitters, located on Barnegat Bay, blocks from the ocean surf, features a bait and tackle shop, boat and jet ski rentals, a café and a dock for fishing and crabbing.

Barnegat Light
Bonito, blues and false albacore were trolled Thursday and Friday on the ocean on the Super Chic, excellent fishing, Capt. Ted said. Seas weren’t great, “but we were able to get the day(s) in,” he said. The conditions were worst on Thursday, but once the boat plowed through seas to reach the fishing grounds, seas were fine for trolling. Clark spoons were trolled, and an overnight trip for tuna was weathered out during the weekend that was supposed to fish the offshore canyons. Two charters are supposed to fish for fluke, and another is supposed to sail for bluefish, this weekend.

Fishing for blues, bonito and false albacore got off to a good start Saturday on the party boat Miss Barnegat Light, a report on the vessel’s Facebook page said. Trips began to sail for them that day, and fluke fished previously. Blues 1 to 4 pounds, bonito 1 to 3 pounds and a handful of false albacore were clubbed. “Plain jigs and smaller hooks were needed, but once we figured out what they wanted, fish started biting,” the report said. The fishing was fair on Sunday, giving up a mix of blues, bonito and chub mackerel, the boat’s Facebook page said. Jigs cast away from the boat and retrieved quickly worked best. The Miss Barnegat Light is fishing for blues, bonito and false albacore 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday. However, the boat is chartered this Saturday, so no open-boat trip will sail that day.

Brigantine
Cool, crisp air felt like fall on Sunday, a report on Riptide Bait & Tackle’s website said. Striped bass could almost be smelled in the air, and water temperatures began to drop, so stripers will arrive soon. “Until then, we will have to play with the blues, kings and sharks,” the report said. The shop previously reported plenty of blues and kings in the surf. Mullet was key for catching the blues, and fresh mullet’s been arriving for bait at the shop. Frozen mullet will also work. Two anglers fought sharks in the back bay behind Brigantine on trips. The most recent trip landed an 8- or 9-foot sandtiger shark that was released. Sandtigers are required to be let go, and the anglers were going to need a larger boat, the report said. The anglers also landed a smaller shark on the outing. The annual Riptide Striper Derby is under way until December 23. Entry allows beach-buggy access to Brigantine’s entire length, when accompanied by a Brigantine beach-buggy permit. Otherwise, not all the beach can be driven. The annual Riptide Striper Bounty, for the season’s first striped bass 43 inches or larger checked in from Brigantine’s surf, is also under way. Sponsored by Hess Plumbing this season, the bounty already reached $285, when last reported here on Thursday. Entry is $5 and required before catching the fish, and the winner takes all the cash. The bounty in spring reached $2,005 when won. A $50 gift certificate to the store is up for grabs for the season’s first striper weighed in from Brigantine’s surf.

Ocean City
The party boat Miss Ocean City fished Saturday and Sunday, Capt. Victor said. The trips sailed after last week’s weather, and the trip Saturday was a charter on the ocean that beat lots of bluefish and croakers. Throwback summer flounder were tossed back, and an open-boat trip fished Sunday, also catching blues and croakers on the ocean. Quite a few more flounder, throwbacks, bit than on the previous day. The Miss Ocean City is fishing for croakers, summer flounder and blues 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily on the ocean.

Sea Isle City
One of the popper-fishing trips for striped bass sailed the back bay
Saturday with Mike Spaeder and son aboard, said Capt. Joe Hughes from Jersey Cape Guide Service and Sea Isle Bait & Tackle. Last week’s weather cooled the bay to 72 degrees, after the water was 80 previously. The lower temperature helped the angling, and five stripers to 26 inches were popper-plugged and released on Rapala Skitter Pops, Joe’s favorite lure for the fishing. He and wife popper-plugged more of the bass Sunday on the bay. Joe on the trip also fly-rodded some on a crease fly, a version he ties with a bigger cup to splash more water. Joe’s charters also popper fish with flies for the bass, and the angling, with either lures or flies, draws explosive, visual attacks from the fish. The bass are usually throwbacks, and the fishing’s good sport, and a specialty aboard. Joe saw as many peanut bunker in the bay as he’s ever seen, and sometimes saw mullet in the water. He heard about no mullet migrating to the ocean yet, but that didn’t mean the baitfish didn’t already. Joe will still try to fish for summer flounder on the ocean this season, but weather caused terrible conditions for boating for the fish recently. Previously, the angling was good. Joe will kick off annual traveling charters to Montauk, New York, this weekend that fish the migration of stripers, blues and false albacore on the ocean. If you ever wanted to fish the migration from the legendary port, he’s going. The angling can be epic, and usually lasts into October. Afterward, Joe fishes the migration when it arrives off Sea Isle City. He also still fishes from Sea Isle during the weeks the Montauk trips sail. He also runs annual traveling charters to the Florida Keys in winter from Christmas to Easter. That can be for a large variety of catches, from redfish and speckled sea trout to tarpon and sailfish. See Jersey Cape’s traveling charters Web page. Keep up with Joe’s fishing on Jersey Cape’s blog.

Avalon
A trip fished off Cape May Point on Sunday with Fins and Feathers Outfitters, Capt. Jim said. That was after all the weather, and the trip sailed from Cape May Canal to reach the water, because the ocean might’ve been rough from Cape May Inlet. Seas weren’t bad on the trip, compared with forecasts for small craft warnings until 11 a.m. All throwback flounder bit, but the fishing was good, steadily picking. Places fished included the Cape May Rips, and thousands of blues schooled, and birds worked small baitfish, at the rips. The trip also fished 1 or 1 ½ miles beyond the yellow cans, and inshore of Wildwood Reef. Jim also guided goose hunting last week in Pennsylvania, and is supposed to do that again on Wednesday. Geese are flying, sporadically, and a few were bagged. That should pick up, and one of the goose seasons is open this month, and another will be open in about another month. The goose trips hunt a variety of locations, from New Jersey to Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and New York. Fins offers a variety of outdoor adventures, including saltwater fishing on the ocean and Delaware Bay, goose and duck hunting, salmon and steelhead fishing on upstate New York’s Salmon River from Jim’s lodge, and fly fishing for trout on Pennsylvania’s streams like the Yellow Breeches. Anglers can even enjoy a combo of striped bass fishing and duck hunting on Delaware Bay in autumn over a series of days. Salmon usually migrate the lower river by now, and Jim heard nothing about the angling yet, but a friend is supposed to fish for them next week. Jim should hear about the fishing then, and the friend probably didn’t plan the trip if he didn’t know the fish arrived. Salmon usually reach the upper river, around Altmar, toward the end of the month, and those catches usually peak the first two weeks of October. That’s where anglers from the lodge usually fish, and the first are booked to do that in the first days of October. Fins can set up the lodge’s anglers to fish with a guide, if they’d like, or the anglers can fish on their own. Or Fins can show the anglers how to fish the run, and then the anglers can fish on their own.

Cape May
Capt. George from the Heavy Hitter visited the dock Sunday to make sure the boat still floated, he said. Few anglers sailed in the weather, except on party boats, large vessels. People at the dock said wind blew strongly Sunday morning, but wind wasn’t’ so bad when George checked on the boat afterward. A trip is supposed to sail for summer flounder aboard Tuesday. An overnight tuna trip is supposed to fish the offshore canyons this weekend on the vessel. Those are the fish the Heavy Hitter is mostly chasing. But bluefish could be trolled on the ocean, and false albacore roamed 20 fathoms before last week’s storm, probably the most recent time anybody fished for them.

Melanie Anne Sport Fishing Charters fished for summer flounder on the ocean Saturday and Sunday, Capt. Frank said. The angling was no good on Saturday. Current ran strong, and some flounder were landed, but were throwbacks, and seas were worse than on Sunday. Some of Saturday’s anglers became seasick. Sunday’s trip bagged a good number of keeper flounder. Cape May Reef and just offshore of the reef was fished, and the south side of the reef was better, or gave up more flounder than elsewhere at the reef. Seas were 4 to 5 feet that day, but in a 6-second swell that was less uncomfortable or not bad. Another flounder trip is supposed to fish Wednesday, but might be weathered out. Take advantage of an end-of-season special on a flounder charter. Get a $100 discount, because flounder season will be closed starting September 28. Tuna trips are also slated, including for this weekend.

Last Thursday's Report
Keyport

The weather kept the Vitamin Sea docked, and no trips on any boats really sailed, Capt. Frank wrote in an email. So there wasn’t much to report, but the next open-boat trips for fluke will fish this weekend, and two spots just opened up for Saturday. Charters are also sailing, and charters are now being accepted for autumn trips for striped bass and blackfish. Like the Vitamin Sea’s Facebook page. “Get your dose of Vitamin Sea!”

Small striped bass moved into the Cliffwood Beach area along Raritan Bay, said Joey from Joey’s Bait Shack. Mostly clams, sometimes bunker heads, grabbed them. Cocktail blues began to show up in the bay. Fluke fishing was good, mostly toward Ambrose Channel and deep water now. Crabbing slowed a little. Anglers now are waiting for striper fishing to pick up. All baits are stocked, including fresh bunker and clams that arrive daily, sandworms, killies, eels, nightcrawlers, frozen bunker and clams, and all the frozen fluke bait, including spearing, finger mullet, smelts and the whole variety of squid, like tube squid and 1-pound boxes of squid.

Atlantic Highlands

Boat trips will return to fishing today, after the hard easterly in past days, said Jimmy from Julian’s Bait & Tackle. While the weather was rough, striped bass and blues were banked from the surf. Snapper blues bit well in the rivers, and Jimmy watched an angler catch them last night. A variety of fish including stripers were hooked from the Navy Pier. Before the weather, plenty of fluke were boated, and they should be again. Crabbing was good.

Everybody knew today would be tough for fluke fishing after the blow for three days, Capt. Ron from the party boat Fishermen wrote in a report on the vessel’s website. No trips fished aboard during the wind. On the first drift, a 6-pound beauty, a couple of more keeper fluke and many shorts were hooked, and the second drift there was no good. The trip moved to several places, including some that produced super previously, and the angling was no good. When the tide changed, that didn’t help either, because the stronger the outgoing ran, the rougher the ocean. A good swell from the east also didn’t help. The boat was power-drifted at the end of the trip, and only an odd keeper and a few shorts came in. Big Moe was high hook with three good-sized fluke. The Fishermen is fishing for fluke 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily. However, a charter is booked this Saturday morning, so no open-boat trip will sail then. Evening trips will now sail for striped bass that bottom-fished previously. Those trips are running 6:30 to 11:30 p.m. every Monday through Saturday.

The party boat Atlantic Star fished every day except Tuesday this week, Capt. Tom said. None of the head boats from the marina sailed Tuesday in strong northeast wind, and the Atlantic Star was one of the few to sail Wednesday. The fluke fishing aboard wasn’t good, but the fish remained in the area, didn’t migrate away because of the weather, so at least there was that. Monday morning and afternoon’s trips picked at shorts and a few keepers. On Wednesday’s trips, the angling wasn’t good, and somewhat of a swell remained, and the water was riled up. The morning’s trip managed a few keepers and some shorts. The afternoon’s picked up a few keepers but quite a few shorts. The water had settled some. On this morning’s trip, Tom said at 9:30 a.m., when he gave this report aboard in a phone call, one keeper was totaled, and a few throwbacks were let go on each drift, so far. The boat didn’t fish the channels Wednesday and today, like trips did previously. Conditions were too rough, but even at places besides the channels, like at Flynn’s Knoll, heavy, 8-ounce weights still needed to be fished, because of wind and current, though the water was less deep. Tom suggests anglers bring two rods, including a heavier for when heavier weight is needed. That’s been because of fishing at the channels, but the heavier rod was useful in the rough conditions everywhere this week. The Atlantic Star is fishing for fluke on two trips daily from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 6 p.m.

Neptune

Last Lady Fishing Charters steamed for cod on the ocean today, the first trip since the wind, Capt. Ralph said. A good catch was pumped in during a window of relatively better weather, and then the weather closed in again. It was rough on the trip. Space is available on the final two individual-reservation trips for fluke the next two Tuesdays, and on a marathon one of the trips Friday, September 26, before fluke season is closed starting September 28. Kids under 12 will sail free, limited to two per adult host, on the two Tuesday trips, but not on the other. Kids sail free like that on the Tuesday trips every year.

Belmar

None of the fleet seemed to sail in the weather, said Capt. Mike from the Katie H. A day-trolling trip for tuna is scheduled for Friday, and an overnight trip for tuna is slated for Saturday to Sunday. The trip Friday might be scrapped, and the overnight trip was already scrubbed, because of forecasts for winds and seas. The anglers just rescheduled, and Mike doesn’t mind sailing in 3- to 5-foot seas, but didn’t want the anglers to take a beating. The overnight fishing grounds was a long way to sail, and the water surely got all “torn up.” The chance was too great that maybe the angling wouldn’t produce. Let another boat head there and find the fish again, he said. Some good fishing for tuna happened before the blow. Closer to shore, fluke fishing was good during the weekend on the ocean, before the weather. Good catches of large ones were made. Anglers will see if the weather affected that. The Katie H fishes both inshore and offshore, and is a big-game specialist. The 46-foot boat features speed and all the amenities.

Wind started to drop out, and the party boat Golden Eagle was supposed to start fishing again today, a report on the vessel’s website said. The Golden Eagle is bluefishing 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. daily and 7:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. See the Golden Eagle’s tuna schedule. Five spots remain for September 28, and nine are left for October 19. Tuna fishing is sold out on October 5 aboard.

Parker Pete’s Fishing Charters was weathered out the last few days, because of wind, Capt. Pete said. He hopes the boat’s fluke fishing sails again soon, and that fluke remain on the fishing grounds on the ocean after the weather. The angling was good on Sunday, the last trip that sailed aboard, covered in the last report. Pete in past reports said good fluking should continue until fluke season is closed on September 28, as long as no major storm causes the fish to migrate offshore for the year. Parker Pete’s this season ran On the Water Seminars, individual-reservation trips that taught bucktailing for fluke, and might offer one more, because there was interest. Charters can also book the seminars. An email about the seminars said: “Are you tired of reading reports of people catching big (fluke)? Do you usually ‘drag’ bait and hope for the big one? Are you being out-fished when you go out fluking? Are you ready to get hooked on bucktailing in a non-threatening way?” Anglers can email Pete for info about the trips. Also, don’t have enough anglers for a charter? Jump on Parker Pete’s website to subscribe to the emailed newsletter to be kept informed about last-minute, individual spaces available to fill in charters. Look for the place to sign up on the right side of the page.

Point Pleasant Beach

Trips were supposed to resume fishing today on the party boat Norma-K III, a report on the vessel’s website said. The boat is sailing for fluke on two trips daily from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2 to 6:30 p.m., and for bluefish from 7:30 p.m. to 1 a.m. daily.

***Update, Friday, 9/12:*** Fluke fishing was strong, the best of the season, on the ocean from about the final 1 ½ weeks of August until this week’s blow, said Capt. Bob from the party boat Gambler. The fishing was kept in port Monday through Wednesday aboard in the weather. But the trips resumed Thursday and today, and the angling was a little slow, caught some of the fish, not like before the nor’easter. The water probably needed to settle for the angling kick back in, probably within a day or two. The last nighttime ling trip, last Friday, pasted the fish, good catches, mixed sizes to 3 pounds, and some large winter flounder and a few squid. Another ling trip was ready to sail tonight, and the last nighttime bluefish trip caught big blues well on Saturday. The Gambler is fishing for fluke twice daily from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 2 to 6:30 p.m. Nighttime wreck-fishing trips are sailing 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. Thursdays and Fridays for ling, cod, winter flounder and squid. Bluefishing trips are running 7:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. every Saturday. Five spaces remain for the year’s first tuna trip, a 48-hour one, on September 23. Then three trips per week will fish for tuna through October, and see the Gambler’s tuna schedule online.

When 15 sea bass was the bag limit last week from Monday through Saturday, catches of them were okay on the party boat Dauntless, Capt. Butch said. The ocean was 74 to 75 degrees, and never became especially warm this year. But the water probably became relatively warm throughout the water column, including the bottom, where the sea bass were, by this time of year. That’s probably why angling for the fish wasn’t great. But the crew was happy for the increased bag limit, and on that Monday, a couple of customers might’ve almost bagged limits. Fourteen might’ve been the high hook, and afterward, anglers probably averaged six to 10 keeper sea bass. Three was the bag limit before, and sea bass season was closed on Sunday. Trips also picked away at ling, not great, and some beautiful, large winter flounder. Fluke were in the mix, and many fluke were hooked on a couple of days. The boat fished in 60 to 90 feet when angling for sea bass, staying shallow. But now the vessel is fishing in 120 to 150 feet. That’s’ where most of the life is, for the fish legal to bag. The Dauntless is bottom-fishing 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. daily. Nighttime trips were wrapped up for the season after Labor Day that previously sailed for bottom-fish and blues.

Toms River

The wind blew weeds into the surf, said John from Murphy’s Hook House. But when the water clears, fluke and blues are swimming the wash at Island Beach State Park, Seaside Park and usual places like that. No fluke were really bagged from Barnegat Bay. No blowfish were heard about from the bay, but John smacked a good catch of huge ones near the BI and BB markers previously, covered in the shop’s report here a week ago. That was news, because blowfish were scarce previously. He’ll head back out for them on Sunday. Snapper blues, fewer than before, skittered the bay and back waters. Crabbing slowed around Tuesday’s full moon, but usually rebounds in a few days. Murphy’s, located on Route 37, bought Go Fish Bait & Tackle this year, and is running both shops now.

Seaside Heights

Surf fishing for fluke was hot the last two weeks, until this week’s weather, said Kevin from The Dock Outfitters. The angling supposedly slowed starting Monday. His dad that day only landed two, and Kevin and his pop banked 15 a day previously. He hopes the catches bounce back, and he fished the surf Tuesday at Island Beach State Park, both on the ocean and Barnegat Bay. He caught nothing, not even snapper blues, but was targeting fluke or striped bass. No stripers bit in the surf yet, and the bass, schoolies, only chomped in the bays, like along Sedge Islands. On Barnegat Bay at the dock, a mess of blowfish, but lots of small, hovered. The bay toward the inlet needed to be fished for bigger. Snapper blues, growing to nearly cocktail size, schooled along the dock. The week’s full moon affected crabbing, but otherwise, a dozen keepers could usually be trapped in 4 hours. Crabbing will improve, he thinks. The Dock Outfitters, located on Barnegat Bay, blocks from the ocean surf, features a bait and tackle shop, boat and jet ski rentals, a café and a dock for fishing and crabbing.

Forked River

Barnegat Bay still harbored fluke, at Double Creek and Oyster Creek channels, said Mike from Grizz’s Forked River Bait & Tackle. Not many reports rolled in about blowfish from the bay, but some talked about 10 blowfish maybe taken in a trip, when the angling was good on an outing. Snapper blues zipped around. Striped bass fishing will probably begin to amp up by mid-October, and definitely by Halloween, in the surf, and maybe the bay. In the bay, the bass are caught on baits including clams and eels.

Barnegat Light

Barnegat Bay’s fluking was probably the same as Ray from Bobbie’s Boat Rentals reported all season, he said. Previously, he said many throwbacks, at least 15 for every keeper, were hooked from the bay, and fishing for the flatfish was supposedly better on the ocean. No reports of blowfish came from the bay, except about one or two of the fish picked up on occasion. Striped bass fishing was yet to improve, but the season was early. Crabbing didn’t change, he said, and previously he reported that crabbing was slow. He knew about nobody who clammed the bay recently. Bobbie’s features a complete bait and tackle shop, a fuel dock and boat and kayak rentals. The boats are used for fishing, crabbing, clamming and pleasure. The store is known for bait supply, including live baits. Baits stocked currently include live spots, green crabs and minnows. Live grass shrimp can be ordered, but four quarts is the minimum.

Barnegat

***Update, Saturday, 9/13:*** From an edited email from Capt. Dave DeGennaro from the Hi Flier: “Looks like there might be a break in the wind and weather this Monday. They’re forecasting a 5- to 10-knot, north wind, which would mean a run to Barnegat Ridge is looking good. If Monday morning comes, and the inlet or sea condition is not as nice as forecast, I’ll have a box of shrimp ordered as Plan B. I’m only accepting reservations from individuals who are flexible with this plan. Keep in mind that the only one who wants to get to the ridge more than you guys is me! That area is alive with bonita, albacore and who knows what else, after all this easterly wind! But as those of you who’ve fished with me know, I do not sail in borderline or questionable sea conditions. 6 a.m. to 12 noon. Three people max. All fish are shared. I’m going to bring a pail of spearing, so we can troll and bait fish the bonita and albies, if conditions dictate. Call to reserve a spot. Tomorrow, Sunday, is going to be a rough ocean, but the bay is fishable, if anyone wants to call for a charter.”

Surf City

Surf casters yanked in bluefish 1 or 1 ½ pounds on mullet, said Joe from Surf City Bait & Tackle. The surf remained rough, but was calming, and would take a couple of days to level out, and wind still blew. A 30-inch striped bass was beached from the surf Wednesday. A couple of kingfish were found in the surf. A few spots swam the bay. Registration is available at the shop for the 60th annual Long Beach Island Surf Fishing Classic that will be held October 6 to November 30. Like Surf City Bait & Tackle’s Facebook page.

Mystic Island

Nobody fished during the week, said Brian from Scott’s Bait & Tackle. The shop’s crew worked on computer stuff, and a customer went to Little Egg Inlet today. The ocean there held 5- to 8-foot rollers, and the inlet held 2- to 3-foot seas. The customer watched a 30-foot boat get tossed around. Wind is forecast for this weekend, too. Summer flounder fishing had been good on the ocean at Little Egg and Garden State reefs. Maybe – maybe – flounder could be found at the Brick Pile in the bay. Croakers swam the bay, and snapper blues schooled the bay and back waters. One angler plucked blowfish at Sheepshead Creek the other day.

Absecon

Fishing was getting into that time between summer and fall fishing, said Capt. Dave from Absecon Bay Sportsman Center. Not many fished in past days, and water was dirty. But this was also the time for weather that changes, or for weather’s to “turn over” to get fall fishing going. Logan from the shop headed out with a buddy, and they reeled in several triggerfish, some big, eating-sized snapper blues and a couple of keeper sea bass, some action, despite wind. White perch swam brackish rivers, biting shedder crabs well. Anglers are waiting for striped bass to arrive, and the store’s Striper Season Kick Off Sale is under way through Sunday. Afterward, the prices will be back to normal, as striper season begins. Dave’s been stocking up for the bass, including loading up on live spots from Maryland. Plenty of live peanut bunker are carried, and live mullet should be stocked. Mullet were coming and going, weren’t as abundant as during some years, for Dave to net. Bloodworms are stocked, including for kingfish, and kingfish were in and out in the surf. Green crabs are carried for blackfish, and bagging a limit of one was fairly easy. A few shedders are on hand, and a few soft-shell crabs are available for eating. The shop raises them, and the end of the run for them was near. The blueclaws stop shedding as the season cools.

Brigantine

Kingfish and blues swam all over the surf, said Capt. Andy from Riptide Bait & Tackle. Wind blew the past four days, so not much happened with fishing, but he knew the fish were still there. Blues were in heavy at the south jetty today, and a couple of anglers said that was great. Mullet rigs are tying into the blues, and bloodworms are latching into the kings. Sharks were fought from the surf. The annual Riptide Striper Derby was launched Friday and will run until December 23. Anglers were excited, a report on the shop’s website said, because entry in the tournament allows beach-buggy access to the entire length of Brigantine, when accompanied by a Brigantine beach-buggy permit. Otherwise, not all the beach can be driven. The annual Riptide Striper Bounty, for the season’s first striped bass 43 inches or larger checked in from Brigantine’s surf, is also under way. Sponsored by Hess Plumbing this season, the bounty already reached $285. Entry is $5 and required before catching the fish, and the winner takes all the cash. The bounty in spring reached $2,005 when won. A $50 gift certificate to the store is up for grabs for the season’s first striper weighed in from Brigantine’s surf.

Atlantic City

There was weather, but fish were axed from Absecon Inlet, said Jeremy from One Stop Bait & Tackle. They needed to eat, and the catches included a few kingfish, croakers, summer flounder, good-sized blues about a foot, and blackfish. Customers fish the nearby inlet, lined with jetties, on foot. A few striped bass, not many, were heard about from the surf. But they started to bite a little more than before. Green crabs are $4 per dozen or three dozen for $10. Minnows are $8.50 a pint, and bloodworms on Tuesdays and Wednesdays are two dozen for $20. Otherwise, the worms are $10.75 per dozen. Baits stocked also include fresh bunker, fresh clams, fresh mullet, all the frozen baits, like mackerel, mullet, head-on shrimp and all the different types of squid for flounder fishing, and more, a large supply. A vending machine dispenses bait afterhours. Friend One Stop on Facebook.

Margate

Summer flounder were tugged from the back bay during the weekend on the party boat Keeper, Capt. John said. A handful were keepers, not bad for the fewer customers this time of year, and scores of throwbacks were tossed back. Plenty of flounder remained in the bay, though during some years many migrate to the ocean already. That seemed because of this mild summer. The Keeper will fish for summer flounder 8 a.m. to 12 noon and 1 to 5 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 12 noon Sunday, and the schedule afterward will be determined. The trips are only $25 for adults, $20 for seniors and $15 for kids, because the fishing is near port, and the pontoon boat is economical on fuel.

Longport

The ocean was calming down last night, Capt. Mike from the Stray Cat said in a phone call then. Trips for summer flounder on the ocean were sold out today through Sunday. That angling’s been good aboard in 75 or 80 feet. Gobs were throwbacks, but keepers were had, and the population of the fish was better than Mike saw in a long time. Anglers better fish for them before flounder season is closed on September 28. With the seasonable rough weather closing in, better not delay. Charters are sailing, and the next open-boat trips for flounder are set for Tuesday and Wednesday. Autumn blackfish charters are booking up. A few Saturdays remain in November and December. The Stray Cat will sail until January 7, and its fishing will be wrapped up afterward for winter.

Ocean City

Fishing was expected to kick off again today on the party boat Miss Ocean City, after being weathered out in past days, Capt. Victor said. The boat is running for summer flounder and croakers 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily on the ocean. However, the vessel is chartered this Saturday.

Most boaters didn’t fish in a week, because of weather, said John from Fin-Atics. The surf was big, and 6 ounces of weight was needed to fish it. Maybe a few fluke were beached, or other fish like croakers. Along the 9th Street Bridge, Corson’s Inlet and the Longport Bridge, blues, sea bass, croakers, flounder and sharks, all of those species small, were hooked. That was all the news in the weather.

Sea Isle City

The water was kind of churned up, but a trip fished the back bay Wednesday with Chris Thompson, said Capt. Joe Hughes from Jersey Cape Guide Service, affiliated with Sea Isle Bait & Tackle. Popper fishing for striped bass wasn’t good because of the dirtied water. But a weakfish was fly-rodded, and that was pretty cool. The trip mostly fly-fished, and weaks seemed to start showing up a little. In the past, weakfishing used to happen in September and October, especially in the ocean. But they also roamed the bay then, and spring has been the time for weakfishing in recent years. That’s in the bay, and included this year. Joe’s trips did catch them there this spring. Summer flounder fishing should be good on the ocean, but trips couldn’t reach the water, because of seas. Joe was sure the ocean was loaded with blues, and he saw bird plays off the beach. Joe each year meets the migration of stripers, blues and false albacore on traveling charters to Montauk. Those trips will begin on September 20, and will last into October. Ever want to fish the run from the legendary port? Joe is going. He’ll also still fish from Sea Isle City during that time, between the Montauk trips. Joe also runs annual traveling charters to the Florida Keys in winter from Christmas to Easter. The Florida trips fish mostly on weekends. That can be for a large variety of catches, from redfish and speckled sea trout to tarpon and sailfish. See Jersey Cape’s traveling charters Web page. Keep up with Joe’s fishing on Jersey Cape’s blog.

Bluefiishing at Townsend’s Inlet was probably best during the weather, said Mike from Sea Isle Bait & Tackle. Seas were built up, and current ran, but the 1-1/2- to 2-pounders were caught, on mullet on mullet rigs on bottom. When seas calmed at the bottom and top of tides, the fish were hit on small metal like Kastmasters or spoons. A few summer flounder were mixed in, but the conditions were tough for flounder fishing. Was flounder fishing good on the ocean before the weather? Mike was asked. He couldn’t remember when boaters could last sail for them, he said. But the angling was productive when they did. A few customers fought striped bass fairly consistently on the back bay, all on top-water lures, especially early in the week. All were throwbacks that were heard about. Tons of small sea bass were played at docks, if anglers looked for something fun. A good crabbing report rolled in. A crabber nabbed 60-some of the blueclaws, mostly females, but they were chewing. In other news, hunting for rails was good along the bay. High tides are good for that, flushing the mud hens or American coots from the weeds they otherwise prefer.

Wildwood

Someone telephoned the shop, asking whether anything was heard about summer flounder, said Mike from Canal Side Boat Rentals. Mike had to laugh, he said, because flounder remained in the back bay. During many years, many of the fish would’ve already departed, migrating to the ocean. But the cooler summer than usual seemed to hold flounder in the bay. The fish included keepers, not a lot, but some, and keepers are especially the ones to depart, usually. A couple of sizeable keepers were brought in through the weekend. Weather was terrible since, but rental boats are reserved to fish the bay again this weekend. A buddy boated two keeper flounder and four throwbacks on a trip on the bay. A Cape May party boat docked 54 keepers, and released throwbacks, from the ocean on a trip, before the weather. Mike would expect flounder to come from the ocean this time of season. Plenty of snapper blues schooled around, including in the canal. Not many blues of larger size were anywhere locally. Lots of small sea bass swam the bay, like every summer. They aren’t usually keepers, and are usually juveniles. Mike reported a keeper the other week. A few striped bass were mentioned from the surf. Not many were, compared with the number of anglers fishing the beach, but a few of the bass were definitely around. Seemed a sign of the changing seasons. Crabbing seemed to improve a little in the bay. Not a lot were bagged, but many of the blueclaws that were throwbacks in July grew to keeper size now. Canal Side rents boats for fishing and crabbing and kayaks. ***Get a $5 discount*** on a rental boat if you mention Fishing Reports Now. Baits stocked include minnows and frozen herring in three per pack, Canadian spearing, mackerel fillets, whole mackerel, mullet fillets, whole bunker, bunker fillets, salted clams in quarts and pints, bags of fresh-frozen clams, all the different types of squid, like tube squid, trolling squid, strips of unscented and scented squid, green strips, pink strips and more. Crabs, both live and cooked, are sold for eating, and picnic tables were set out this year to enjoy them. The crabs have been from Maryland, because the blueclaws have been scarce for commercial crabbers in New Jersey this season. Live crab prices previously ranged from $28 to $38 per dozen, and the price depends on market price and size of the blueclaws. No. 2’s from Miles River, Md., are supposed to be delivered Saturday, and if they are, the price will probably be $15 per dozen. No. 1’s from the river were stocked at the shop previously, and some were beautiful. But not all the crabs were actually No. 1’s, yet the price was still a higher price for the larger crabs. Cooked crabs are $4 additional per dozen.

Cape May

The Heavy Hitter is supposed to overnight for tuna at the canyons this weekend, but boating looks shot this weekend, because of weather forecasts, Capt. George said. Tuna swam the canyons, all the way offshore. A few stragglers roamed the 50-fathom line, but fishing for them wasn’t practical. The next trip that might sail aboard might be on Tuesday for summer flounder, if the weather shapes up. Flounder fishing was pretty good, not bad, on the ocean, weeding through lots of throwbacks for keepers. Plenty of the flatfish could be cranked in, if conditions were right. Bluefish were mixed in, and trips could target blues on the troll on the ocean. False albacore gathered along the 20-fathom line about the last week that could be trolled.

The fleet sat tight in the weather, said Capt. Frank from Melanie Anne Sport Fishing Charters. Wednesday morning was the first calmer weather since the blow, but the wind picked back up later in the day. A tuna trip is supposed to fish offshore aboard this weekend, and looks like it’ll be weathered out. Frank was going to make the call today. ***Update, Saturday, 9/13:*** Take advantage of an end-of-season special on a summer flounder charter. Get a $100 discount, because flounder season will be closed starting September 28.

The northeast wind kept the party boat Porgy IV docked the past three days, Capt. Paul said. But summer flounder trips were supposed to resume today aboard. The angling, on the ocean, was sometimes good previously, giving up a bunch of sizeable flounder on several days. John Poluchuck from Philadelphia limited out on the fish to an 8.3-pounder. Jack Cassady from Philly won the pool with an 8-pounder on Saturday. Anglers who also limited out on recent trips included Pete Martine from Vineland, Jack Almond from Audubon and John Riccardi from Williamstown. Nobody can know whether the fish will bite, or where, when trips resume. If a swell is leftover today, the fish might not bite until that settles. But Paul hopes to get back on the flounder when the conditions lay out. The Porgy IV is fishing for summer flounder at 8 a.m. daily.

Mullet started to arrive in the surf, and keeper striped bass 30 inches, not big, were known to be slid from the water on occasion, said Nick from Hands Too Bait & Tackle. Lures imitating mullet were what to fish, and Daiwa Salt Pro Minnows, or SP Minnows, in Laser Green Shiner worked especially well. But mostly bluefish popped into the surf, at Poverty Beach and Cape May Point. Sometimes weakfish were mixed in at the point. Sharks were still fought from the surf. Blackfish fed along the jetties, mostly on the ocean, instead of Delaware Bay. A few kingfish from the surf began to be mentioned from Poverty and Diamond Beach. Sometimes flounder were banked at the Cape May ferry jetty on Delaware Bay. On the back bay, striper fishing was good at night at bridges. Nick bagged a striper and a weak at a bridge during the weekend. Striper fishing was good along the sod banks in early mornings on soft-plastic lures or popper plugs. Off Cape May Point for boaters, good catches of croakers were sometimes reported from Cape May Channel. No boaters sailed the ocean for flounder in the weather. A couple of good catches of flounder were known about from northern Delaware Bay, like toward Miah Maul, last week. Nick fished offshore last Thursday with Common Sense Charters. A white marlin and a half-dozen gaffer mahi mahi were landed at Baltimore Canyon. Baits stocked include bloodworms, green crabs and minnows.